Friday, December 2, 2011

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Sunday, October 30, 2011

It's official...

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"Everything's going to be OK"
or is it "It's all for the best?"
Thanks Christer

Monday, September 26, 2011

New collective identities...

Occupy wall street freak show

What Marx was about was trying to encourage people to overcome their social isolation, which is produced in this market, individualist, commodified society; to create new social identities, new collective identities, and organizations that express those; and undertake a massive social and political transformation.

The very lucid Leo Panitch on The Real News

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

a simple sonnet

"Shakespeares Sonette" by Robert Wilson and Rufus Wainwright at the Berliner Ensemble, 2009

form is void

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

For Randy

Embedded Recipe Image (Unsupported on IE 7 and earlier)
Amish White Bread

I got this recipe from a friend. It is very easy, and doesn't take long to make.

Ingredients

  1. 473.2 ml warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
  2. 157.7 ml white sugar
  3. 22.2 ml active dry yeast
  4. 7.4 ml salt
  5. 59.1 ml vegetable oil
  6. 1419.5 ml bread flour

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, dissolve the sugar in warm water, and then stir in yeast. Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam.
  2. Mix salt and oil into the yeast. Mix in flour one cup at a time. Knead dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth. Place in a well oiled bowl, and turn dough to coat. Cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
  3. Punch dough down. Knead for a few minutes, and divide in half. Shape into loaves, and place into two well oiled 9x5 inch loaf pans. Allow to rise for 30 minutes, or until dough has risen 1 inch above pans.
  4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 minutes.
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Sunday, August 7, 2011

Europa

native_europe4-2011-08-8-06-37.jpg
This is what I have on my desktop as I listen to a gloomy BBC and try to get my mind around a multi-lingual, ethnically diverse union reaching the kind of consensus that seems impossible for the largely white, largely male, largely rich, monolingual, two-party U.S. Congress.
A larger version can be found here.

The apartment seems so empty...

Asta-2011-08-7-17-09.jpg
Now that Asta’s gone home.

Friday, July 29, 2011

The Messenger

tumblr_lf5lxvvjSB1qf0aaf-2011-07-29-07-45.jpg

Four hours later: sorry, I should have attributed this, but I was half asleep and had a thunder-frightened dog in my lap, It is, of course, by the great French illustrator Jean Giraud, aka Moebius and I found it at the website quenched consciousness.

Saturday, July 16, 2011

I have a lot on my mind...

413px-RobertFuddBewusstsein17Jh-2011-07-17-07-54.png

The only thing more weird than reaching 67 years-old, is to suddenly be faced with the prospect that you might, very easily, become one of those homeless old men, wandering the streets, looking for dinner in dumpsters. If Social Security checks don’t go out on the first of next month, that’s where I’m apt to be. I was so proud of myself for maintaining a $1000 cushion in my account for fifteen years. Then, suddenly, it was gone, eaten up by the decline of the dollar, the increase in bank fees, and general slow attrition of a decade without salary. I know it’s impolite to write about money, especially in a world where so many are in so much more frightening circumstances than I. But I find myself waking up each morning with my mind trapped in an anxiety loop. It’s exhausting to spend the first three hours of every day climbing back to a level of objective nonchalance. I have to get it out of my system before I can write about anything else.

I'm Back!

ClivePoster-2011-07-16-21-50.png

This young man’s name is “Clive Poster.” Isn’t that perfect!? It has been a long hard slog to get up and running again. I “upgraded” my operating system and, of course, nothing worked. This, the blog software is the last bit I’ve managed to figure out. My computer is much faster and noisier and, of course, I have a reliable broadband connection at last. But it all cost$ -- such a scam. I’m losing patience with Apple... Ubuntu here I come!

Saturday, June 25, 2011

Cooking now...

Embedded Recipe Image (Unsupported on IE 7 and earlier)
Amish White Bread

I got this recipe from a friend. It is very easy, and doesn't take long to make.

Ingredients

  1. 473.2 ml warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
  2. 157.7 ml white sugar
  3. 22.2 ml active dry yeast
  4. 7.4 ml salt
  5. 59.1 ml vegetable oil
  6. 1419.5 ml bread flour

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, dissolve the sugar in warm water, and then stir in yeast. Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam.
  2. Mix salt and oil into the yeast. Mix in flour one cup at a time. Knead dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth. Place in a well oiled bowl, and turn dough to coat. Cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
  3. Punch dough down. Knead for a few minutes, and divide in half. Shape into loaves, and place into two well oiled 9x5 inch loaf pans. Allow to rise for 30 minutes, or until dough has risen 1 inch above pans.
  4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 minutes.
Search, share, and cook your recipes on Mac OS X with SousChef!

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

110531 Tue 10:30

After a productive start, I seem to have hit a dry stretch, usually the indicator of a mild depression — the best way out: write more, even if you cannot think of a thing to write about. All indications are that summer has arrived in ernest, starting today. It’ 21°C at 10 o:clock and the computer weather prognosis is for it to stay sunny and get warmer over the next four days. Yesterday I did the first mowing of the lawns, until the battery expired and I plan to do more today. It’s a good way, too, out of the doldrums. 

Saturday, May 28, 2011

110528 Sat 22:58

Today was the BRF (apartment co-op) Garden Clean-up. It is always more pleasant than I expect it to be. At the prescribed hour, everyone in the building just immediately sets to work: usually the “Three Ladies” and me, although sometimes kids come out to help. In Spring we clear the winter detritus and reinstall the garden furniture. Now we have a garden service, Lövstra Kooperativet,  that comes earlier in the month and does the heavy underbrush clearing, tree pruning and trash hauling. But that is mostly because two of the members, my upstairs neighbor and I, are getting older and the fifth member rarely participates. Things were beginning to get a little out of control, with the two younger ladies doing the bulk of the work. It’s a relief to have paid assistance, but I think we all feel a little as if we’re cheating. I usually bustle around reassembling the large table, pumping up tires, and recharging the lawn-mower — manly things. Raking, weeding, edging and sweeping the walks is a communal effort and ongoing. Then we sit and have coffee and kardemumma bullar in the waning light and discuss future plans, present problems, and a bit of gossip. It is a very Swedish kind of group effort, and I love the way it re-establishes friendly civility on a regular basis. This is the kind of ritual that America seems to have lost in its rush to commercialize every human interaction, or make every minute pay. The benefits are barely quantifiable, difficult to describe, but unmistakable once you’ve experienced them.

110528 Sat 10:09

I’ve felt guilty about not writing when my mind is so full. But it tends to inhibit the flow when there’s too much to think about. I just posted three disparate, but somehow connected things at HUGObserver: Gil Scott Heron’s obit, a link to lots of Olle Eksell graphics, and a funny comment on religions from Didier Lestrade. All three are synonymous, in my mind at any rate, with the Fifties/Sixties, and each represents a new tendency then that has, still, not reached any kind of resolution. The promise of that era has, pretty much fizzled in every one of those aspects: social equality, neo-socialism, gay liberation, and religious skepticism. If anything, we seem to be moving backwards. Both Scott-Heron and Lestrade have become icons when, at the time, I was only faintly aware of them — funny how the awesomely notorious rebels of our youth begin to seem like friendly contemporaries as we both grow older. It’s different for the ones who die; they are encased in an amber bubble of fame, almost instantly, and stay as remote as they ever were, or more-so if they achieve cult status. Perhaps, though, things are not that much different now and it is I who have lost the optimism of Youth that made it all seem so much more potent.

Friday, May 27, 2011

110527 Fri 10:27

Huge clap of thunder around five o:clock this morning, followed by fifteen minutes of real rain, which tapered off to the usual Gotland drizzle and then stopped after about an hour. But it was enough to put me into a sound and comfortable sleep until 9:00. Now it’s sunny with that clear light that comes after a storm; the sky is blue, the air is chilled, and the garden is sparkling (not to mention the new crop of dandelions in the lawn).

Thursday, May 26, 2011

110526 Thu 15:11

The first item on my list of "Places I Have Lived" is Riverview Court, outside Annapolis, MD. That, I think, is Kay sitting in front, reading the newspaper. It was a strange little old house, perfectly in keeping with the post-war ambiance of the times. We lived there until I was six, Lisa was five, and Gordon, I believe, was on the way. Don was assigned to the Chesapeake Bay Naval Chemical Station, from which I remember him coming home in the evening in the Studebaker we had then - I can remember standing in the upstairs veranda, watching him park in the turning circle off the left of the photograph. In later years, we rented a smaller house, just down the hill, which became Don's "Studio," more photographic than writing, in those days, but just as dark as his places always were and with that characteristic smell that was a combination of him and chemicals.

110526 Thu 10:36

A restless night of anxiety dreams: being summoned into the office of the Apotek and told, in the most kindly polite way, that they could no longer fill my prescriptions without full payment. This is actually not far from likelihood, although it will probably be handled much more clumsily. Instead of arguing for my Residency, which all acknowledge I should have, they just retreat into the rule-book (and cover their own butts: human nature). But I told myself I would not write about money in my journal, and I won't, even when it haunts my dreams. Sleeping is such a mixed blessing anyway when you reach my age; every fourth or fifth night I sleep like an adolescent and wake refreshed. Otherwise it's like bobbing up and down on a sea that refuses to engulf me. That's when the dreams come, and the stomach-aches, and the leg cramps. But it's rarely bad enough to simply give up. I always still manage to extract some rejuvenation from the six hours; changing position and drifting off for another hour. It's probably just as well I don't have a bed-mate, although maybe such a one would provide the security I need to sleep soundly.

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

110525 Wed 19:13

I've sent the first entry to HUGOnline, announcing my intention to make it my online journal. Despite the usual disclaimers, I'm still a little leery of being too completely myself in public, if for no other reason than it's apt to be deadly: self-involved, whiney, and all the other criticisms I generally heap on my journal-keeping. Now the "Sessions" tabs in this application make a lot more sense! Things which are just too ghastly or irrelevant or this kind of meta-commentary can be isolated from that which is published. Besides, I don't even know if it's possible to write completely publicly. While it is good discipline to always bear an audience in mind, it can also be so inhibiting as to deform one's written personality. As always, it's a balancing act. Now that I think about it, though, it is kind of liberating to not have to think in terms of graphics, just words.

110525 Wed 18:53

Things are changing and, without even thinking about it much, I've been changing with them. Tumblr has become the easiest way to capture images and quotes and, for months now, I've found myself using it in lieu of Blogger, my original web address, which has languished. Thus, adapting with the times, I've decided to make HUGOnline much more a written blog, a kind of online journal, while switching my short attention span to HUGObserver. Insofar as these entries will be generated directly from my computer journal ("viJournal," is the software, for those interested) it is apt to become much more personal; so much so that I'm breaking this automatic link with Facebook (but retaining the one with Tumblr). In a way, I guess, I'm giving fair warning: while I don't intend to indulge in excess profanity or anything overtly libelous, neither am I going to self-censor much beyond general editorial correctness. So, if you'd rather not know the personal details of my life (apt to be pretty boring, in any case) or share my angst, now is the time to trash this bookmark.

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Some days...

Frozen!


















For the first time in 25 years, the sea around Gotland has nearly frozen solid. The ice sheet is predicted to reach as far south as Öland within the next few days. It's COLD!

Sunday, February 13, 2011

“People today have forgotten they’re...


mudwerks:
quotevadis:

“People today have forgotten they’re really just a part of nature. Yet, they destroy the nature on which our lives depend. They always think they can make something better. Especially scientists. They may be smart, but most don’t understand the heart of nature. They only invent things that, in the end, make people unhappy. Yet they’re so proud of their inventions. What’s worse, most people are, too. They view them as if they were miracles. They worship them. They don’t know it, but they’re losing nature. They don’t see that they’re going to perish. The most important things for human beings are clean air and clean water.”


Akira Kurosawa, a Japanese film director, producer, screenwriter and editor. Regarded as one of the most important and influential filmmakers in the history of cinema, Kurosawa directed 30 films in a career spanning 57 years. Some of his films include Rashomon (1950), Ikiru (1952), Seven Samurai (1954), Yojimbo (1961), Kagemusha (1980), Ran (1985), Madadayo (1993)

Street Art


By Armo, found on La Cienega Blvd., LA